Persuasive Essay Supporting Details Examples

What is a persuasive/argument essay?

Persuasive writing, also known as the argument essay, utilizes logic and reason to show that one idea is more legitimate than another idea. It attempts to persuade a reader to adopt a certain point of view or to take a particular action. The argument must always use sound reasoning and solid evidence by stating facts, giving logical reasons, using examples, and quoting experts.

When planning a persuasive essay, follow these steps

  1. Choose your position. Which side of the issue or problem are you going to write about, and what solution will you offer? Know the purpose of your essay.
  2. Analyze your audience. Decide if your audience agrees with you, is neutral, or disagrees with your position.
  3. Research your topic. A persuasive essay must provide specific and convincing evidence. Often it is necessary to go beyond your own knowledge and experience. You might need to go to the library or interview people who are experts on your topic.
  4. Structure your essay. Figure out what evidence you will include and in what order you will present the evidence. Remember to consider your purpose, your audience, and you topic.

The following criteria are essential to produce an effective argument

  • Be well informed about your topic. To add to your knowledge of a topic, read thoroughly about it, using legitimate sources. Take notes.
  • Test your thesis. Your thesis, i.e., argument, must have two sides. It must be debatable. If you can write down a thesis statement directly opposing your own, you will ensure that your own argument is debatable.
  • Disprove the opposing argument. Understand the opposite viewpoint of your position and then counter it by providing contrasting evidence or by finding mistakes and inconsistencies in the logic of the opposing argument.
  • Support your position with evidence. Remember that your evidence must appeal to reason.

The following are different ways to support your argument:

Facts - A powerful means of convincing, facts can come from your reading, observation, or personal experience.

Note: Do not confuse facts with truths. A "truth" is an idea believed by many people, but it cannot be proven.

Statistics - These can provide excellent support. Be sure your statistics come from responsible sources. Always cite your sources.

Quotes - Direct quotes from leading experts that support your position are invaluable.

Examples - Examples enhance your meaning and make your ideas concrete. They are the proof.

Here are some ideas of popular persuasive essay topics:

  • Anorexia or model body
  • Encouraged abortions
  • School uniform
  • ...

These essay topic examples are debatable, it is important to choose the topic that is interesting for you.

The term "supporting details" can be defined as additional information that explains, defines or proves an idea.

The term might sound simple, but because this concept is so important in many types of writing or speaking, it’s highly recommended that you make sure you understand exactly what it entails.

Understanding Supporting Details

Whether you’re writing a research paper, making a sales pitch, or defending yourself in court, you should never underestimate the importance of providing the factual details to support your claim.

Supporting details aren’t just meant to give more information about a situation – they’re also meant, literally, to support your point, meaning that without them, you may not succeed in making your argument successfully. Using supporting details properly could be crucial in a variety of situations, whether you’re defending your innocence… or just your thesis.

Real World Examples of Supporting Details

Imagine that you find yourself in court fighting a traffic charge. The other driver was at fault in the wreck, but he is trying to claim that you were to blame. The two of you could go into court and simply argue back and forth. This could go on forever, and how would the judge ever know who was telling the truth? Without any solid, clear evidence in one direction or the other, it would be virtually impossible to tell.

Now imagine, however, that the other driver caused the accident because he was talking on his cell phone. You could certainly go to court and simply tell the judge that the other driver was distracted and this led to the wreck, but why would the judge believe you? Telling the judge that the driver was, in fact, on his phone would be providing him with essential supporting details. Ideally, you could even have the driver’s phone records brought into court to prove he was on the phone at the time of the accident, thus providing even more supporting details to bolster your claim. This is the kind of factual, detailed evidence that explains why you reached the conclusion that you reached, and helps provide a background that proves the veracity of your point.

Academic Examples of Supporting Details

In a less serious, but no less valid scenario, let’s say that you’re writing a research paper about how women are discriminated against in the job market. If you turn in a paper that simply states women are paid less, and treated differently, than male employees, no professor is going to be impressed. Sure, these are fairly well-publicized facts, but simply repeating them with no evidence to back yourself up isn’t exactly impressive – or convincing. 

However, suppose you gather data from various statistical studies showing the differences in male versus female salaries. Suppose you interview female employees versus male ones at particular companies, and get their personal testimonials about how their treatment has been biased. Suddenly you have a whole arsenal of supporting details that show your professor, and anyone reading your paper, that you didn’t just pull your claims out of thin air. This is the power of the right supporting details.

Supporting Details Define the Decision

The idea behind supporting details is simple; it’s all about providing information to explain and bolster your opinion, claim, or belief. How did you reach the conclusion or opinion you reached? The surest, simplest way to convince someone else to see it your way is to provide them with the same information you used to reach that decision.

Remember, it’s difficult to argue with the facts, and the more supporting details you can provide, the more evident it is that the facts are on your side.

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What Are Supporting Details?

By YourDictionary

The term "supporting details" can be defined as additional information that explains, defines or proves an idea.The term might sound simple, but because this concept is so important in many types of writing or speaking, it’s highly recommended that you make sure you understand exactly what it entails.

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