Franklin D.Roosevelt The New Deal Free Essays

Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal Essay

It was called "relief." Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal provided relief to millions of Americans who had lost their homes, their jobs, and their hope. Many others felt that the radical new policies of FDR threatened the sanctity of the Constitution and free enterprise. Roosevelt's New Deal policies had many critics but among the most vocal were groups like the American Liberty League and powerful Socialists who argued that the New Deal policies either went too far or not far enough in solving the problems that faced the nation.
Roosevelt's critics came from both ends of the political spectrum. The American Liberty League was an opposing group made up of conservative businessmen and corporate leaders. Believing that the free enterprise system was being attacked, they accused Roosevelt of trying to install a dictatorship in place of the federal government. In an excerpt from a 1935 article in Fortune magazine, the Roosevelt Administration is thought to be a government of men and not laws. The author compares Roosevelt to a dictator and calls his theory of federal administration "menacing and dangerous". Another political cartoon printed in the June 1936 issue of Current History, ridicules the Liberty League as being alarmist in accusing Roosevelt of bringing communism into the country.
Herbert Hoover, a former president, agreed with the conservative ideas of this
group. He disagreed with New Deal Legislation such as the Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) or the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA). The basic idea of these New Deal programs was to lower the supply of goods to the current, depressed level of consumption. Under the AAA, the government sought to raise farm prices by paying farmers not to grow surplus crops. Other reforms that Hoover had issue with was the establishment of the TVA. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) was a public works project that spanned seven states. TVA damns helped control floods and also provided a source of hydroelectric power to the area. Never before had the federal government undertaken a project of such scope and maintained control over the public works it helped create. Reformers had pushed for the development of the nation's water resources a source of electricity but opposition from the utility companies had been too great to overcome. Hoover was one such opponent of government intervention in the free
enterprise system. In a speech given in October 1936, he attacks Roosevelt's
policies. " ..this New Deal attack upon free institutions has emerged as the most
significant issue in America. This attack includes…price fixing through codes,
‘economic planning' to coerce the farmer.…plans to put the government into business
competition with its citizens..."
Another opponent of Roosevelt's New Deal came from an unexpected...

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The Great Depression and Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal Essay

858 Words4 Pages

The Great Depression and Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal

During the 1930's, America witnessed a breakdown of the Democratic and free enterprise system as the US fell into the worst depression in history. The economic depression that beset the United States and other countries was unique in its severity and its consequences. At the depth of the depression, in 1933, one American worker in every four was out of a job. The great industrial slump continued throughout the 1930's, shaking the foundations of Western capitalism.

The New Deal describes the program of US president Franklin D.
Roosevelt from 1933 to 1939 of relief, recovery, and reform. These new policies aimed to solve the economic problems created by the…show more content…

Businesses that complied with the codes were exempted from antitrust laws, and workers were given the right to organize unions and bargain collectively. After that, the government set up long-range goals which included permanent recovery, and a reform of current abuses.
Particularly those that produced the boom-or-bust catastrophe. The NRA gave the President power to regulate interstate commerce. This power was originally given to Congress. While the NRA was effective, it was bringing
America closer to socialism by giving the President unconstitutional powers. In May 1935 the US Supreme Court, in Schechter Poultry
Corporation V. United States, unanimously declared the NRA unconstitutional on the grounds that the code-drafting process was unconstitutional. Another New Deal measure under Title II of the National
Industrial Recovery Act of June 1933, the Public Works Administration
(PWA), was designed to stimulate US industrial recovery by pumping federal funds into large-scale construction projects. The head of the PWA exercised extreme caution in allocating funds, and this did not stimulate the rapid revival of US industry that New Dealers had hoped for. The PWA spent $6 billion enabling building contractors to employ approximately
650,000 workers who might otherwise have been jobless. The PWA built everything from

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